GLHS sophomore named to Microsoft teen council

Posted: 5/15/2017 Categories: HOMEPAGE Headlines, Press Releases, Lincoln High School News

It’s official: selections have been made for Microsoft’s inaugural Council for Digital Good! Gahanna Lincoln is excited to announce that sophomore Bronte Johnson has been chosen as just one of 15 teens from across the U.S. who will advise Microsoft at their Redmond, Washington, campus!

This one-year pilot program will gather students, ages 13 to 17, regularly for council summits to help lay the groundwork for a new approach to online interactions, and to further champion Microsoft’s work in digital civility.

Bronte was selected from received hundreds of applications, which included detailed essays and videos about applicants’ lives online, their perspectives on Microsoft, and their hopes and expectations for the council experience. She is one of nine young women and six young men, all of whom accepted, from 12 states: California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee and Washington.

Microsoft’s goal for the council is to help young people fully appreciate and understand the risks and potential harms associated with life online. They hope to gain perspective from council members on the state of online interactions today; what might make the online space healthier, safer and more enjoyable; and reflect on how Microsoft can play a part in shaping that future.

GLHS sophomore named to Microsoft teen council

Posted: 5/15/2017 Categories: HOMEPAGE Headlines, Press Releases, Lincoln High School News

It’s official: selections have been made for Microsoft’s inaugural Council for Digital Good! Gahanna Lincoln is excited to announce that sophomore Bronte Johnson has been chosen as just one of 15 teens from across the U.S. who will advise Microsoft at their Redmond, Washington, campus!

This one-year pilot program will gather students, ages 13 to 17, regularly for council summits to help lay the groundwork for a new approach to online interactions, and to further champion Microsoft’s work in digital civility.

Bronte was selected from received hundreds of applications, which included detailed essays and videos about applicants’ lives online, their perspectives on Microsoft, and their hopes and expectations for the council experience. She is one of nine young women and six young men, all of whom accepted, from 12 states: California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee and Washington.

Microsoft’s goal for the council is to help young people fully appreciate and understand the risks and potential harms associated with life online. They hope to gain perspective from council members on the state of online interactions today; what might make the online space healthier, safer and more enjoyable; and reflect on how Microsoft can play a part in shaping that future.