Honoring the Holocaust with Governor Kasich

Posted: 5/5/2018 Categories: District News, HOMEPAGE Headlines, Lincoln High School News, Blacklick Elementary News, Chapelfield Elementary, Goshen Lane Elementary News, High Point Elementary News, Jefferson Elementary News, Lincoln Elementary News, Royal Manor Elementary News, Middle School South News, Middle School West News

Honoring the Holocaust with Governor Kasich

By Hannah Secrist, Student Journalist, Junior GLHS

Over the past four years, Jennifer Candor’s WWII class has been working to honor the lives of the six million Jewish people who perished in the Holocaust through The Paperclip Project.

Each year, her students write letters requesting paper clips from family members, actors, professional athletes and, like in my case, political figures. At the beginning of the semester, I wrote a letter to Governor John Kasich, in which I explained how the project’s goal was to collect paper clips that would be put in a memorial built at GLHS. I was determined to hear from Governor Kasich, so I sent a letter not only to his office, but to his home.

To my surprise, shortly after I sent the letter, Candor received an email from a Kasich staffer who wanted to put me on a phone call with the governor. I was ecstatic that someone as busy as Governor Kasich would take the time to directly contact a high school student such as myself.

On the phone, Kasich asked me a hard question: would our class be satisfied with collecting only one million? However, as I told him, the truth of the matter is that one million paper clips inaccurately represents the horrors of the Holocaust. To collect one million pape, though it seems like an impossible task, clips would be amazing, but six million is our ultimate goal.

I told Governor Kasich that our classes will not be done until we reach six million. I believe Kasich’s aim in asking that question was to see where our hearts and minds lied, and to understand our level of dedication to the project. After speaking with him for a short while, he personally invited the WWII classes to the statehouse for a tour of the Holocaust memorial that was constructed under his tenure.

On March 2nd, the two WWII periods took our day-long field trip to see the memorial. We were greeted by the state house staff and shown the history of the building. Then, we were taken into a beautiful conference room where we later met the governor. As the one who orchestrated the visit, I was given the honor of sitting next to Kasich. Along the long wooden table, there were small boxes of paper clips placed at each seat that read, “If you save one life, it is as if you saved the world.”

Even though the atrocities that took place during the Holocaust are over, it does not mean that prejudices and hate do not exist. Our classes had the opportunity to ask Kasich a few questions and listen to the advice he had for us. Governor Kasich built his memorial because he felt that “it is not good enough to only recognize the Holocaust one day a year.”
The takeaway from this experience, in the words of Governor Kasich, is that “it takes belief to be able to change the world.”

He also explained that it is our job to make the world more accepting and connected. Especially as young people, it is our responsibility to fix the world. In the case of our WWII classes, making that change starts with commemorating the lives lost during the Holocaust.


Honoring the Holocaust with Governor Kasich

Posted: 5/5/2018 Categories: District News, HOMEPAGE Headlines, Lincoln High School News, Blacklick Elementary News, Chapelfield Elementary, Goshen Lane Elementary News, High Point Elementary News, Jefferson Elementary News, Lincoln Elementary News, Royal Manor Elementary News, Middle School South News, Middle School West News

Honoring the Holocaust with Governor Kasich

By Hannah Secrist, Student Journalist, Junior GLHS

Over the past four years, Jennifer Candor’s WWII class has been working to honor the lives of the six million Jewish people who perished in the Holocaust through The Paperclip Project.

Each year, her students write letters requesting paper clips from family members, actors, professional athletes and, like in my case, political figures. At the beginning of the semester, I wrote a letter to Governor John Kasich, in which I explained how the project’s goal was to collect paper clips that would be put in a memorial built at GLHS. I was determined to hear from Governor Kasich, so I sent a letter not only to his office, but to his home.

To my surprise, shortly after I sent the letter, Candor received an email from a Kasich staffer who wanted to put me on a phone call with the governor. I was ecstatic that someone as busy as Governor Kasich would take the time to directly contact a high school student such as myself.

On the phone, Kasich asked me a hard question: would our class be satisfied with collecting only one million? However, as I told him, the truth of the matter is that one million paper clips inaccurately represents the horrors of the Holocaust. To collect one million pape, though it seems like an impossible task, clips would be amazing, but six million is our ultimate goal.

I told Governor Kasich that our classes will not be done until we reach six million. I believe Kasich’s aim in asking that question was to see where our hearts and minds lied, and to understand our level of dedication to the project. After speaking with him for a short while, he personally invited the WWII classes to the statehouse for a tour of the Holocaust memorial that was constructed under his tenure.

On March 2nd, the two WWII periods took our day-long field trip to see the memorial. We were greeted by the state house staff and shown the history of the building. Then, we were taken into a beautiful conference room where we later met the governor. As the one who orchestrated the visit, I was given the honor of sitting next to Kasich. Along the long wooden table, there were small boxes of paper clips placed at each seat that read, “If you save one life, it is as if you saved the world.”

Even though the atrocities that took place during the Holocaust are over, it does not mean that prejudices and hate do not exist. Our classes had the opportunity to ask Kasich a few questions and listen to the advice he had for us. Governor Kasich built his memorial because he felt that “it is not good enough to only recognize the Holocaust one day a year.”
The takeaway from this experience, in the words of Governor Kasich, is that “it takes belief to be able to change the world.”

He also explained that it is our job to make the world more accepting and connected. Especially as young people, it is our responsibility to fix the world. In the case of our WWII classes, making that change starts with commemorating the lives lost during the Holocaust.